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3 vacant mills in western Massachusetts are sold

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Wednesday, August 6, 2014

Screenshot 2014-08-09 11.14.18

Associated Press

LEE, Mass. — A Wisconsin-based development company has bought three vacant paper mills in western Massachusetts and is talking with local officials and others about how to use the properties.

Niagara Worldwide of Niagara, Wisconsin, bought the Columbia and Greylock mills in Lee and the Niagara Mill in Lenox Dale. The sale prices weren’t disclosed.

Niagara President Eric Spirtas told The Berkshire Eagle (http://bit.ly/1kmp41j ) that his company is working with local officials, other developers and prospective tenants on possible redevelopment of the mills, which were closed more than six year ago by previous owner Schweitzer-Mauduit International. Spirtas also says the company will be seeking the public’s input.

The Columbia and Niagara mills date back to the 1800s, while the Greylock Mill was built in the mid-1960s. All three are in residential neighborhoods.

___

Information from: The Berkshire (Mass.) Eagle, http://www.berkshireeagle.com 

Prepared by:
NIAGARA Worldwide LLC
Eric J Spirtas
President

USA Address:
WISCONSIN
 – 1101 Mill Street, Niagara Wisconsin 54151
OHIO – 43840 Ohio #7, Hannibal Ohio, 43931
MISSOURI – 6727 Langley Ave., St. Louis Missouri 63123
+1.314.780.3742 Direct – +1.866.735.9925 Fax
eric.spirtas@niagaraworldwide.com
www.niagaraworldwide.com

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60 million tons of Basalt Reserves at the Niagara Development have been confirmed

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60 million tons of Basalt Reserves at the Niagara Development have been confirmed to be the more desirable pillow Basalt with the ability to produce large slabs. These findings were confirmed by Paula Leier-Engelhardt, P.G., C.P.G., principal geologist for HydroGeo Solutions. The more commonly quarried columnar Basalt will not produce the large slabs necessary for large scale dimensional stone production.

Niagara Basalt Reserves Flipbook

Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.58.02 Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.59.06 Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.58.49 Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.58.27

1512 Washington – Manitowoc Wisconsin 54220 – NIAGARA Worldwide will work with EJ Spirtas Manitowoc LLC and Manitowoc Development Patners LLC to Re-New this City Block

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What do we do with this “Historic City Block”?

First Thought… Redevelop…?

Second Thought… Wreck…?

Anyone?  Anyone?

Manitowoc /1512WashingtonSt.jpg

CLICK HERE (“OR”) ON THE PICTURE TO ACCESS THE LOOPNET LISTING

Attachments

 
Historic Mirro Building
Developed By: EJ Spirtas Manitowoc, LLC
5 Building Complex
7 Story High Rise – 500,000 Sq Ft
6 Story High Rise – 400,000 Sq Ft
3 Story – 250,000 Sq Ft
5 Story Connector – 150,000 Sq Ft
3 Story Connector – 125,000 Sq Ft
6 Acre Property

Historic Downtown Development Opportunity

Take your business to 1512 Washington Street, Manitowoc, Wisconsin.

Building Description

The historic Mirro plant has more than 1,000,000 square feet of space on a 7.49 acre redevelopment site that is located on the edge of Historic Downtown Manitowoc.

Within walking distance of downtown amenities such as the Capitol Civic Centre, the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Rahr West Art Museum, Manitowoc Riverwalk, Manitowoc Marina, Manitowoc Yacht Club, Mariners Trail, Lake Michigan, Library, Farmers Market, SS Badger Lake Michigan Car Ferry and dozens of shops and restaurants, this is a development opportunity that is immediately available.

Building Information  Utilities
Address: 1512 Washington Manitowoc, WI
Electricity supplier:  MPU
Total sq ft available:  1,408,520
Gas supplier:  WPS
Number of stories: 7
Municipal water:  Yes
Ceiling heights: 8’5″ to 12’7″ 
Water source:  Lake Michigan 
Site size (ac):  7.49
Peak capacity at water plant:  11 mgd 
Topography: Flat
Peak capacity at sewerage plant:  15.5 mgd 
Setting: Downtown    
Zoning: Industrial Telecommunications  
Former Use:  Mirro Fiber
Optics:  Yes
Digital switching:  Yes
Transportation Nearest major highway:  US Hwy 151/10 Incentives  
Distance to nearest highway: Adjacent Development Zone Tax Credits   
Number of lanes: 2 Industrial Revenue Bonds  
Nearest interstate:  I-43 Revolving Loan Fund   
Distance to nearest interstate:  4 miles  TIF  
Number of lanes:  4 Technology Zone Tax Credits   
Nearest commercial airport:  Austin Straubel
Distance to nearest airport:  40 miles     
Rail service:  No    
Nearest port facility:  1 mile


Terms
Leasing Rate:  Negotiable
Lease Type:  Negotiable
Sale Price:  Negotiable
 
Building Contact 
Name: Eric J. Spirtas 
Phone: (314) 432-7733
 
Community Contact 
Name: Dave Less 
Title: City Planner 
Organization: City of Manitowoc 
Address: 900 Quay St 
City: Manitowoc 
State: WI
ZIP: 54220
Phone: (920) 686-6930
Fax: (920) 686-6939
Email: dless@manitowoc.org
Web: www.manitowoc.org

295 Motors SOLD! NIAGARA Worldwide pegs another great sale!

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Written June 24th, 2011 – NIAGARA Wisconsin

From the NIAGARA Development project site in Niagara Wisconsin, Eric J. Spirtas and Burdette Wilber negotiate, prepare and hold another e-auction that has clearly satisfied the seller and the buyers.

The key to designing a successful auction (“Live or On-Line”) requires the knowledge of an experienced auctioneer.  Lot sizes, location, blend of goods, length of sessions…  These decisions are not guesses, but more so proactive strategic determinations that come from years industry exposure.  


A smart customer and a smart liquidator make for a smart auction…  The process is not magic.  There are many ways to fail, but in most cases there are a few ideal paths to success.

A customer must always beware of the (“guarantee”).  There is no such thing, unless the auctioneer is putting up cash to buy the lot at a base number, or truly bonding the results.  Most times the “hustling” liquidator is trying to play on the perceived dollar signs in the eyes of his customer.  

As NIAGARA Worldwide closes another sale, it is important to reflect on the points that aid in running a successful auction.

10 Points on How to Run A Successful Auction!

  1. Because your auction is of a specific nature it is imperative to select an auctioneer that is ideally suited to this type of Auction. For example, a Fine Art Auctioneer is not always the person to select when conducting a charity auction which may include sporting memorabilia and assorted items that have been donated.
    The success of your auction often depends on the ability of the auctioneer and his knowledge of the type of goods being submitted to auction. The hype and spontaneous activity that comes with these types of auctions requires certain qualities such as a quick wit, an ability to “get on with it” and sell for extended periods at a fast pace. Alternatively, more refined auctions such as Fine Art calls for an auctioneer that displays a good level of patience and decorum. Selection of the most suitable auctioneer is sometimes understated and many auctions fail to reach the desired results and standards because of poor selection.
  2. Much credence should be given to the selection of the Auction venue when organising your auction. The venue should reflect the quality and type of auction being held in order to achieve your maximum result. When conducting an auction it is often difficult to judge the projected size of the crowd and therefore the crowd catering in relation to seating and general hospitality is dependant on these factors. It is very important that potential purchasers have the necessary access to auction items in order to ascertain their value and suitability to their needs. Special emphasis should be placed on the venue because too much room or too little room at the wrong venue will be counterproductive to the success of the auction.
  3. Sufficient advertising and promotion of your auction is absolutely critical to it’s success. Select the best possible advertising mediums to expose your specific auction and attempt to reach the target market by way of these mediums. Very careful consideration needs to be given to the target market when deciding on the most suitable advertising campaign. Depending on the type of auction, the time and value of the campaign can vary quite substantially but it is important not to under expose the auction if you wish to maximise the financial result. Having a strong, qualified crowd of buyers goes a long way towards success.
  4. Ensuring that sufficient, trained staff are engaged to assist in all facets of the auction process is very important. The presence of relevant staff members in areas of registration, presentation of items, acceptance and delivery of auction items etc is a critical component of a successful auction.
  5. When conducting an auction of any type it is imperative that the auction items are presented to the public in the best possible condition. In an ever-increasing competitive world, pristine presentation will strongly enhance a seller’s chances of achieving a good price for their auction items. Attention to detail in presentation is sure to be rewarding.
  6. An important part of the auction process is to provide a number of payment options to satisfy the needs of the buying public. These days acceptable methods of payment at the most auctions are cash, personal cheque, bank cheque and various forms of credit card options. Auction items will normally remain on site until full payment is received unless alternative arrangements are made prior to auction. It is important for the auctioneer to make everyone aware of auction payment conditions prior to commencement of the auction.
  7. To continue the smooth operation of the auction process it is important that buyers are able to take delivery of their auction purchases with a minimum of fuss. Trained staff will assist with efficient delivery of items once payment has been made. Safe delivery is an important part of the process.
  8. Re-enforce the absolute necessity to receive full payment for auction items prior to collection by buyers. Failure to enforce the payment policy can be a financial disaster. History tells us that a soft approach in this area of the auction process often leads to moral and financial disappointment.
  9. When formalizing an agreement with an auctioneer it is important to discuss the financial settlement arrangements once the auction is completed. Once again, depending on the type of auction being conducted, the auctioneer (or his agency) will collect the auction proceeds and, in turn, disperse the proceeds to the relevant recipients. Normal deductions prior to release of funds to the seller will include Agents Commission and Advertising.
  10. The information obtained from Buyer Registration forms will provide invaluable contact details for future auctions. The growing of your database of potential purchasers can lead to the ongoing support and success of your auctions for many years to come.

    (“10 Points on how to run a successful auction are a reprinted from find an auctioneer.com.au”)

Call today if you are looking for guidance and support at your facility.  Let us earn you a maximum payout!

Eric J. Spirtas – 314.780.3742 – eric.spirtas@niagaraworldwide.com

PGW Pressurized Ground Wood System

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The recent purchase of a complete WOOD ROOM and PGW “Pressurized Ground Wood” System has presented an abundance of available equipment.

System Picture

PGW Fiber Department

Pressurized groundwood (PGW) fiber is the primary source of fiber used for producing coated groundwood paper.

Woodyard and Woodroom

Woodroom Equipment

Wood Room Equipment

Local aspen wood was formerly delivered by truck to an on-site 7 area Woodyard that has the capacity to hold 20,000 cords of wood.  The wood was then processed in the Woodroom (building 113) where it was debarked and cut into 4 foot lengths at a rate of 19 cords per hour.  A delivery system processed and fed the resulting bark and wood waste to the boilerhouse where it was burned as fuel.

PGW Pulpmill

The shortened and debarked lengths of aspen from the Woodroom were conveyed to the pulpmill 100 cord capacity storage bin for storage (building 101).  The wood was then fed to the main Pulmill’s (building 100) four 7000 hp pressurized grinders where it’s ground to pulp at a rate of 280 tons per day (70 tpd per grinder).  Next, the pulp was thickened and pumped to the screening and bleaching area located near the paper machines

PGW Screenroom and Bleach Plant

Final PGW fiber processing was accomplished in the Screenroom (building 95) and Bleach Plant (building 15), both were located in the main mill area near the paper machines.  Here the pulp was screened through numerous very fine slotted screens where only the proper size fibers were accepted for making paper.  The rejected fibers were thickened and refined down to a more acceptable size before being screened again.  The final low brightness screened pulp was then pumped to the bleach plant where it was bleached using a two stage alkaline peroxide bleaching process that both brightened and improved the pulps’ strength properties.

PGW Fiber Department process details

Woodyard

●    Constructed in 1998

●    Encompassed 7 acres

●    Capacity to store up to 20,000 cords of logs

●    Wood was harvested primarily within a 150 mile radius of the mill

●    Approximately 125,000 cords of aspen are received each year

●    The yard is open Monday through Friday

●    Almost all wood is received by truck

●    Wood inventory is managed on a first-in-first-out (FIFO) system

●    Older wood is retrieved from one lot, while fresh wood is decked in the other

●    One operator on shift Monday through Friday

Woodroom

●    The log debarking and cutting system was installed in 1998 with start-up on December 20, 1998

●    The process was supplied by Andritz Kone wood

●    The woodroom is rated at 19 cords per hour

●    Pulp is supplied to the pressurized Groundwood plant

●    Two operators per shift

Log Loading Deck – capacity 15 cords

Deicing Chamber – capacity 7.5 cords

Compact Wave Feeder – new in 2006

Two Debarkers

– one on-line and one off-line

– rated at 20 logs per minute

Nicholson A5A - Manitowoc DeBarker

Slasher Deck – logs cut to 50″ lengths

Slasher Deck on Woodroom Log Cutter

Pulpmill

●    The pressurized groundwood pulpmill started up on February 15, 1990

●    Pulp is produced on four Tampella 7000 hp pressurized grinders

●    Each grinder is rated at 70 tons per day or 280 tons per day total

●    The log delivery system is supplied by Kone wood

 ●   Three operators per shift

Process…

●    100 cord peeled log storage bin of aspen

●    Kone wood log conveying and feed system

●    Four Tampella grinders, Model T1812, each driven by a 7000 hp motor and rated at 70 ton per day

–   35 psi grinder pressure

–   196 degrees F shower water temperature

–   230 degrees F discharge stock temperature

●    Pressurized disc thickener supplied by Hedemora

●    12 ton stock chest

●    Grinder stones supplied by Norton

      -Bolt through design is used

      -Stone life of approximately three years

●    Roberts stone grinding systems – pattern is 6 x 28 at a depth of 0.030

●    Specific energy Consumption (SEC) is controlled at 65  resulting in a unscreened pulp at:

      -180 Canadian Std. Freeness

      -59 to 60 brightness

      -3.17% pulmac shive count which includes refiner rejects

●    Tamsec distributed control system controls the Kone log feed system and the grinders

●    Bailey Infi 90 distributed control system is used to control the stock system

Pressurized Groundwood Screening

Process…

●    Six ton screen supply chest

●    Two primary course screens, P1, Bird 400 with 0.032 profile screen baskets

●    Four primary screens, P2, Hooper PSV 400 with 0.005 low profile wedge wire baskets

●    One secondary screen (S1) processing the rejects from the P1’s – Ahlstrom F2 with a 0.032”             profile screen, accepts are fed forward to the P2’s

●    One secondary screen (S2) processing the rejects from the P2’s

      -Tap 200 with a 0.004” slotted screen

      -Accepts are fed forward to the decker

●    Cleaners

      PRIMARY

      -First stage             64-5” celleco 350

      -Second stage        40-5” celleco 350

      -Third stage             16-5” celleco 350

      -Fourth stage          6-5” celleco 350

      -Fifth stage             1-5” celleco 300

      SECONDARY

      -First stage             22-celleco 270

      -Second stage        6-celleco 270

      -Third stage             2-celleco 270

●    Thickener

      -One Hedemora and one Dorr Oliver disc filter, feed consistency 0.5 to 0.8% discharge consistency

       Approximately 8%

      -5 ton storage chest

●    Screened reject system

      -DSM Screen for thickening

      -2 SL4S Thune screw presses

      -2 reject refiners, one on stand-by 20 HPDT

      -Screened reject rate approximately 40%

●    Screened unbleached pulp storage

      -100 ton stock storage chest

      – 60 ton stock storage chest

      -5 ton stock storage chest

      -12 ton bleach supply chest

●    Screen unbleached pulp properties

      -120-135 Canadian standard freeness

      -62 brightness

      -98.3 opacity

      -6.85 tensile

      -21.54 burst

      -0.57 pulmac

●    Post refining

      -Two 42” sprout twin flow refiners, 1000 HP and 1500 HP

      -Approximately 0.9 – 1.2 HPDT

●    One operator per shift

Groundwood Bleaching

●    The mill uses a two stage alkaline peroxide bleachery to brighten the groundwood pulp as well as develop pulp strength properties

●    Brightness target out of the 1st stage is 68 and 2nd stage is 83-84

●    Current bleaching and delivery systems provide two different brightness mechanical pulps for the paper machines

High Brightness System

Presses for bleach feed

●    One 2.6 meter Andritz twin wire press, 25% discharge consistency with 145 TPD

●    One 2.6 meter Andritz twin wire press, 32% discharge consistency with 135 TPD

Chemical addition system

●    There are two chemical feed systems

●    No. 1 chemical system for #3 press

●    No. 2 chemical system for #4 press

●    Peroxide, caustic and sodium silicate are injected into static mixers for each feed system along with chemical carrier water from the washer seal box

●    No. 1 and No. 2 chemical system adds the bleach liquor to the pulp at a double shafted pin mixer for each press

●    The chemical feed rate

      -Peroxide = 66 lbs./ton

      -Caustic = 65 lbs./ton

      -Silicate = 15 lbs./ton

●    Bleaching takes place in the bleach tower at 15 to 22% consistency

●    The temperature in the bleach tower ranges from 120 to 150 degrees F

●    The pH feeding the presses is 5.6 and in the tower during bleaching it is 9.5

●    Bleach tower

      -40 ton capacity

      -Retention time of 2-4 hours

●    The system has two Impco drum washers, each with four shower headers

●    The filtrate is used for tower dilution, washer feed dilution, chemical carrier water and wasting to the anaerobic treatment plant

●    The consisgtency feeding the washers is approximately 2.0% and the discharge is at 4.5%

Medium Brightness System

●    1st stage Alkaline peroxide bleaching takes place in the standpipe to the medium brightness high density tank

●    The chemical feed rate is:

      -Chelant      3 lbs./ton

      -Caustic      20 lbs./ton

      -Peroxide    12 lbs./ton

      The pulp consistency at the point of addition is 5.5%

●    The pH is 5.6 and the stock temperature at this point in the process varies from 135 to 150 degrees F

Bleached Pulp Storage

●    Total bleaching capacity

      -Medium bright system:       150 TPD

      -High bright system:                222 TPD

●    Storage

      -Medium bright system:       80 Tons

      -High bright system:               20 Tons

Bleached Pulp Properties

●    High Bright

      -CSF           78

      -Brightness 82-84

      -Opacity      94

      -Pulmac      0.13

      -Porosity     71.9

      -Bulk           2.5

      -tTensle       8.8

      -Scott bond            100

      -Burst         28.8

      -Tear           0.42

●    Medium bright

      -CSF           92

      -Brightness 68

      -Opacity      96

      -Pulmac      0.17

      -Porosity     99

      -Bulk           2.8

      -Tensle        8.0

      -Scott bond            77

      -Burst         25.3

      -Tear           0.39

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