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60 million tons of Basalt Reserves at the Niagara Development have been confirmed

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60 million tons of Basalt Reserves at the Niagara Development have been confirmed to be the more desirable pillow Basalt with the ability to produce large slabs. These findings were confirmed by Paula Leier-Engelhardt, P.G., C.P.G., principal geologist for HydroGeo Solutions. The more commonly quarried columnar Basalt will not produce the large slabs necessary for large scale dimensional stone production.

Niagara Basalt Reserves Flipbook

Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.58.02 Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.59.06 Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.58.49 Screenshot 2013-11-15 09.58.27

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NIAGARA DEVELOPMENT COMMITS TO A 2012 FACE LIFT

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January 16, 2012 – NIAGARA WISCONSIN (For Immediate Release)

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NIAGARA DEVELOPMENT COMMITS TO A 2012 FACE LIFT 

 

Niagara Development is quickly approaching its February 11th one year anniversary as owner of the former NewPage Paper Mill in Niagara Wisconsin and operator of the 1,300 acre property conversion that straddles the Menominee River in both Dickinson and Marinette Counties.

After exhaustive research and on site review from industry experts and business redevelopment teams from around the region, it has become clear that many of the “purpose built” structures on the site were not an advantage to new comers, but as stated by most suitors, a deterrent to utilization and restoration.  “NIAGARA has engaged real estate and construction professionals alike to walk the vacant buildings that were used for the manufacturing of ‘Paper’, ‘Pulp’ and ‘Power’ in order to outline options that fit the areas reuse plan.  Every response focused on the difficulty of conversion to standard industrial use,” says President of NIAGARA Development, Eric J Spirtas.  “Every professional sees the immediate value in the; Shipping, Coating and Warehouse buildings, but highlights a ‘disconnect’ when considering the reuse of the remaining large multi-story industrial buildings.”

Recently a National firm contacted NIAGARA Development, offering to buy all of the structures and associated equipment at the facility to “Demolish and Scrape” the entire site, creating a cleared brownfield parcel.  This proposal did not fit NIAGARA Development’s desire or intent.  Instead NIAGARA Development took this opportunity to strategically plan the retention of the most marketable buildings, while accepting parts of the original proposition, which will result in the removal of the un-usable buildings.  This work will start immediately and will open up the remainder of the site for re-purposing of any type.  “Removing the unsuitable buildings will provide NIAGARA with a unique opportunity to market available space to any type of company and then specifically design buildings and usage patterns that fit the needs of today’s buyer,” says Spirtas.

The company removing the unusable structures will also spend a significant amount of money getting the railroad back in full operation giving NIAGARA Development a distinct advantage in marketing the property to new businesses.  “Bringing in upgraded rail will be a benefit to the mill property’s long-term redevelopment plans providing greater value to the remaining buildings,” says Niagara Mayor, George Bousley.  “Rail will be rebuilt from Kimberly Road to the mill site.”

“The Niagara facility offers some exceptional opportunities in Northeast Wisconsin for manufacturing and warehousing/distribution,” according to Tom Scheuerman, CPA, and managing broker of Grubb & Ellis|Pfefferle in Appleton, WI.  “From our vantage point, the repositioning and reuse of a former manufacturing facility like in Niagara offers great advantages for both companies looking for affordable space with excellent attributes and local communities with outstanding ready work forces.  In order to attract new business into an area, we have seen that facilities like Niagara are critical to that process because they are on-line and ready for occupancy.  This facility offers some exceptional manufacturing space, low-cost power, waste water treatment, expansion capability, rail service and hundreds of acres of land that can be very attractive to new businesses.”

Spirtas continues to show his commitment to the local area by setting up his corporate headquarters known as NIAGARA Worldwide at the Mill.  He will be using the former Clubhouse building as his main offices.  Extensive renovations are underway in that structure right now for occupancy in the next few weeks.  NIAGARA Worldwide specializes in services ranging from; Acquisitions, Consulting, Contracting, Development, Mining, Liquidation, and Trading.  Niagara Worldwide is NIAGARA Development’s first tenant setting up its operation in the notable Clubhouse building.

“The NewPage Niagara Mill redevelopment team named the Upper Menominee River Area Alliance (UMRAA), including New North, Inc., continues to focus on repurposing the mill site,” said Jerry Murphy, Executive Director of New North, Inc., the economic development organization of the 18-county region of Northeast Wisconsin, known as the New North region.   “The Redevelopment team looks forward to continuing to work with NIAGARA Worldwide to market the existing mill site for future use.”

“The current ownership of Niagara is optimizing the site and removing old buildings that are functionally obsolete and a deterrent to future use and development.  This will enhance the site and allow for expansion capability around the structures that are usable for manufacturing and warehousing.  This approach of preparing sites and redevelopment of the facilities offers the greatest opportunity to attract new business.  We have seen this formula work successfully in other communities,” says Scheuerman.

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For more information about; NIAGARA Development or NIAGARA Worldwide, contact Eric J Spirtas – 314.780.3742 or by email at eric.spirtas@niagaraworldwide.com or through the company web site – www.niagaraworldwide.com.

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ADDITIONAL “CLUB HOUSE” HISTORY AND INFORMATION:

The first Club House was built in the year 1907 with the formal opening early in 1908.  The original building included a soda fountain, a small ice cream parlor, poolroom, shower and locker rooms, bowling alleys, and the gymnasium, which served alternately as gymnasium and theater.  A second floor housed the library, a dining room and kitchen, and rooms rented by the Masonic Lodge.  The Club House was rebuilt in 1926, with only the gymnasium of the original building remaining.  The bowling alleys were moved to the west side of the building, the ice cream parlor was enlarged as was the soda fountain, and the large lobby was constructed and furnished.  In addition, the second floor at that time had a modern kitchen, dining room: a Women’s Club Room, and lodge Rooms.

The Papermill Workers’Unionmaintains an office there.  The Skating Club used the Club facilities for planning their Annual Ice Review.  The second floor housed the Village Offices, and there was a Village Board Room.  The Post Office was located in the northeast corner of the first floor, and the Girls Scouts maintain a room on the second floor for their meetings.  The Niagara Community Club remained a truly “community” affair, for few activities of theNiagaravillage came into being without the Club playing some part.

NIAGARA Development seeks buyer of “On-Site Power Generation and Utilities”!

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With the various economic incentives, prospective manufacturers, possibility of supplying electricity behind the meter, or with a complete rebuild to sell electricity to the grid (using one of the many BIO-Fuels benefit programs), one could quickly negotiate with NIAGARA Worldwide to get the recently shut down facility, bought, leased or managed.


Contact us today to set up a site walk and process review:
Eric J Spirtas – President NIAGARA Worldwide LLC – 314.780.3742 – eric.spirtas@niagaraworldwide.com


Steam Production

The New Page mill has (4) four 75,000 lb per hour coal fired power boilers (located in building 45) that produce process steam for drying paper, heating water, heating the buildings and producing power. Coal is delivered by truck from the Escanaba lakefront dock to an on-site storage yard, which has a 10,000 ton storage capacity.  The coal is then processes through a crushing and screening system (located in building 97), where it is sized for use dependent on the boiler being supplied (stoker or pulverized coal fired).  Two of the four boilers also have the ability to burn wood waste as a supplemental fuel.  Wood waste is produced on-site in the PGW fiber pulping process and also purchased locally.  All four boilers are ducted through a common state of the art electrostatic precipitator (building 90) and electrostatically enhanced baghouse to control particulate emissions.  The baghouse was installed in 2006 at cost of 7.5 million dollars and is considered the best available control technology (BACT) for particulate matter control.


Filtered Water

The Menominee River
is the main source of water for the paper mill. A pumping station (located in building 57) draws water from the river and pumps it to the water filtration plant (located in building 56) where it is treated for suspended solids and color.  The plant capacity is approximately 7.2 million galloons per day.


Waste Water Treatment

Waste water is treated by means of two different processes.  An aerobic facility (buildings 89, 93, and 104) treats low BOD process waters at a maximum average capacity of 8 million gallons per day.


Waste Water Treatment
(Continued)

An anaerobic treatment facility (building 99) pre-treats high BOD process waters at a rate of 1.5 million gallons per day.  Solids from the treatment facility’s are concentrated using two Andritz presses (building 103) and then spread on local farming land.

Utility Department Process details

Steam Generation

Typical Monthly Totals

Total steam produced:  132.4 mm lbs.

Boilerhouse auxiliary:  12.4 mm lbs.

Steam turbines:  24.3 mm lbs.

Process:  95.7 mm lbs.

#1 Boiler

1939 combustion engineering water tube boiler

Steaming capability

75,000 lb/hour 80% efficient (coal)

450 lb. steam @ 675 deg.

Fuel used – pulverized coal

15,000 tons of coal per year

2 – CE Raymond 372 bowl mills

New Ro type burners in 1996

6” wide x 10’ long x 8’ tall dutch ovens that burn 14,250 tons of bark per year

Bark produces 30 to 35 K/Lb/hour

wood waste:  70% efficient

2 five million BTU natural gas ignitors for lighting off the coal

#2 Boiler

1939 combustion engineering water tube boiler

Steaming capability

75,000 lb/hour 80% efficient

450 lb. steam @ 675 deg.

Fuel used – pulverized coal

15,000 tons of coal per year

One CE-Raymond 453 bowl mill

Installed in 1997

New Ro type burners in 1996

2.6’ wide x 10’ long x 8’ tall dutch ovens that burn 14,250 tons of bark per year

Bark produces 30 to 35 K/Lb/hour

Wood waste:  70% efficient

2 five million BTU natural gas ignitors for lighting off the coal

 

#3 Boiler

1948 combustion engineering water tube boiler

Steaming capability

75,000 lb/hour 85.5% efficient

450 lb steam @ 675 deg.

Fuel used – pulverized coal

27,000 tons of coal per year

CE Raymond 453 bowl mill

DCS Bailey Infi 90 installed in 1999

2 five million BTU natural gas igniters for lighting off the coal

#4 Boiler

1963 Babcock & Wilcox Detroit roto-grate stoker

Steaming capability

75,000 lb/hour 86.1% efficient

450 lb steam @ 675 deg.

Fuel used – 1 ¼” x 3/8” stoker coal

Coal fed into boiler by three Detroit roto-grate stokers

23,000 tons per year  

Controls

All boilers and auxiliaries are controlled by a Bailey DCS system

#2 boiler in 1997

Auxiliaries in 1998

#1 boiler in 1998

#4 boiler in 1998

#3 boiler in 1999

Coal Crusher

Designed to run 50 tons per hour of run of mine coal (6” x 0” or 5” x 3/8”)

Gunlach Machine Company double stage crusher

Coal crusher building

Crushes the coal into two categories (2” x 1 ¼” and 3/8” x 0”)

All coal is sent to a double deck vibrating screen where the sizing takes place

Stoker coal 1 ¼” to 3/8” goes to #4 boiler

Coal 2” to 1 ¼” and 3/8” to 0” goes to pulverized coal boilers #1-2-3

Stocker coal pile – 8,724 tons

Stoker coal is stored in a 60 ton silo until use

Coal storage area can hold 10,000 tons of coal

 

Coal Specifications

Heating value – 13,000 BTU/lb. (min 12,500 BTU/lb)

Ash content – target 7.5% maximum 8.5%

Moisture – 5% maximum

Sulpher range – 0.8% to 1.8%, 2% maximum at 13,000 BTU/lb.

Grind – 50 to 55 HGI

Volatile matter – 35% to 38% based on fuel specification

Fixed carbon – 19% to 52% based on fuel specification

Ash fusion – target 2,300 Deg. F ID

 

Bark Handling System

Drag type conveyor system that handles 14 tons of bark per hour

All of the woodbark (15,000 tons/year) that is blown to us, plus what we receive from an outside supplier (42,355 tons/year)

All wood waste is burned in boilers #1 & 2 dutch ovens

Produce 30 to 35 K/Lb/hr in each boiler from wood wastes

3.15 pounds of steam per pound per bark

Ash Handling System

Two ash silos

South silo

Unloader is rotary drum type (1962)

Collects ash from all 4 boilers

Bark furnaces back end and fly ash

Dry ash handling system

North ash silo

Unloader is from United Conveyor Model 1535/45 twin paddle mixer

Ash comes from the precipitator, ash hoppers under each field

Dry ash handling system

All ash hauled to a company owned solid landfill site

Precipitator

1974 electrostatic precipitator with one common stack from all four boilers

Four fields have weighted wires in the first three fields

Fourth field installed in 1997 with riged discharge electrodes

Controlled by a precip-tech SQ-300 automatic voltage controllers

Efficiency is 99.8% at zero opacity

Baghouse

GE Max 9 baghouse installed in 2006

Electrostatic enhanced

First of its type in operation

Nine modules, 1188 bags

Maximum temperature is 500 degrees F

300,000 Acfm gas volume

Clarage #173 5450 RHW ID fan

86 ½” diameter

300,00 CFM, 20” S.P. 450 degrees F

1250 HP, 1200 RPM ID fan motor with spare

Variable hydraulic Gyrol drive with spare

Howden size 315 class 4

Internal pump geared for 1200 RPM


Power Generation

The FERC hydro project number 2536-009 has been sold to Northbrook Energy

Raw Water Supply System

Basin Capacities

Quick mix basin – 24,000 gallons

Flocculation basin – 80,000 gallons

Settling basin – 2,000,000 gallons

Clearwell – 600,000 gallons

Six filter beds – 392 ft2 each

Raw Water Supply Pumps

Primary – Two vertical 3500 GPM pumps per 250 HP motors

Backup – One pump, 7500 GPM

Chemical Feed Systems

40-80 ppm alum at raw water pump discharge – dosage dependent on river water quality and temperature

0-2.0 ppm coagulant polymer (alum replacement) at raw water pump discharge

0-2.0 ppm flocculent polymer at discharge of quick mix basin

10:1 ratio NaOC1:NaBr added at feed to filter beds – closed loop ORP control to 780 target

Chemical Storage Tanks

Filter plant

850 gallon flocculent polymer

2 tanks 2500 gallons each – sodium hypochlorite

2 tanks 1500 gallons each – sodium bromide

Pump house

1500 gallons coagulant polymer

8000 gallons alum

Powerhouse

1500 gallons coagulant polymer

Sludge Removal

DCS operated zone valves remove sludge from settling basin to sludge pit

40 HP sludge pump empties sludge pit to effluent plant sewer

Each filter bed backwashed once per day

50,000 gallons per filter

Backwash recycled automatically to quick mix basin – 300,000 gallons per day

Process Description

The process is controlled by the Bailey DCS

The primary pumps are supplied from a 40,000 tank located under the powerhouse – Two sources supply this tank

In winter, warm water from #2 turbine condenser (8000 gpm) is reclaimed for heat value

Any additional makeup (100% during summer months) is provided by a 20” line from the penstock

Alum and coagulant polymer are added at the pump discharge for good mixing

The raw water is pumped through a 16” heat traced line to the quick mix basin at the filter plant

A flocculent polymer is added at the discharge of the quick mix basin as the water enters the flocculation basin

Solids settle in the settling basin and the water is disinfected as it enters the filter beds

From the filter beds, the water enters the clear well for distribution to the mill

Each filter is backwashed once per day for approximately five minutes at 10,000 gpm

In-line meters track the turbidity before and after the filters

Disinfection is controlled by an ORP controller

Filters

Leopold underdrain with Integral Media Support Cap

10” silica sand

14” filter anthracite

Air scouring headers on 4 of 6 filters

Environmental

Anaerobic Pre-Treatment Facility

Purpose:  To treat high BOD process waters

Neutralization tank (175,000 gallons) – combination of high BOD waste waters and waste-activated biosolids from the aeration system

Two anaerobic reactors (2,450,000 gallons each)

Degas tank (34,800 gallons)

Gravity clarifier (734,000 gallons)

Settled biosolids aer split into two streams, one stream is sent to the dewatering plant (80 gpm) and one stream is returned to the anaerobic reactors (600 gpm)

Effluent from clarifier is sent to aerobic treatment facility (1,500,000 gallons per day)

Biosolids Dewatering Plant

Purpose:  To concentrate biosolids for use in the Niagro program or for landfill

Two Andritz presses (400 gpm maximum capacity each) – settled biosolids from the anaerobic plant clarifier are combined with underflow solids from the primary clarifier in the aerobic treatment facility

Average production:  250 gpm, 30 dry tons per day

Aerobic Treatment Facility

Purpose:  To treat low BOD process waters, effluent from the anaerobic plant and effluent from the dewatering plant

Primary clarifier (2,460,000 gallons)

Average flow into clarifier 6,500,000 gallons per day (5.5 million in winter and 7.5 million in summer)

Underflow solids sent to dewatering plant

Overflow sent to aeration tanks

Two aeration tanks (40,000 gallons & 871,000 gallons)

Two rectangular secondary clarifiers (945,000 gallons & 1,081,000 gallons)

Settled solids are split into two streams, one stream is sent to the anaerobic plant (250 gpm) and one stream is returned to the aeration tanks (9200 gpm)

Effluent is sent to the Menominee River (6,000,000 gallons per day average)


Contact us today to set up a site walk and process review:
Eric J Spirtas – President NIAGARA Worldwide LLC – 314.780.3742 – eric.spirtas@niagaraworldwide.com

September 15th, 2011 – 2:30pm (CST) – Valuable Property Auction handled by NIAGARA Worldwide – 500 North Pine Street, Iron Mountain Michigan 49801

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Great opportunity on an IRON MOUNTAIN Michigan

Industrial Property

Come and Join us to participate or just come and watch.

Highlights

  • MAIN Building – 17, 500 Sq Ft
  • OFFICE Space – 2,400 Sq Ft
  • LUNCH Room – 400 Sq Ft
  • FIVE – 5 Ton Hoists on 10 Ton Bridges
  • Block and Metal Construction
  • Electrical, Heating, and Gas Updated in 1995

Description

(“2”) Former Metal fabrication Shops (IRON MOUNTAIN and WHITE PINE MICHIGAN), are up for AUCTION / LIQUIDATION.

For a flyer of available property, click on the picture below.

or our main site – http://www.niagara worldwide.com.

The building,
complete with; electric, water, and sewer systems will also be liquidated
(“September 15th 2011”). Buildings are ready for occupancy with cranes and
utility distribution.

Contact me today to discuss complete purchase of Land and BUSINESS, all in place and ready to operate.

Iron Mountain
Michigan is the gateway to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan from Wisconsin, Illinois, and Indiana. It is 2 hours from Green Bay, 3 1/2 hours from Milwaukee, and 5 hours from Chicago.

Iron Mountain is one of the largest cities in the Upper Peninsula and offers everything from lush forests, miles of rivers and streams, four seasons of outdoor recreation, and abundant wildlife, art, and music festivals, museums, Pine Mountain Ski Jump, famous sport competitions, along with unique shopping and dining opportunities.

CLICK ON PICTURE FOR FULL BROCHURE AND FLYER

Contact me today with Questions!

Eric J. Spirtas – Niagara Worldwide LLC – 1101 Mill Street, Niagara Wisconsin, 54151
314.780.3742 Direct – 866.735.9925 Fax
eric.spirtas@niagaraworldwide.comwww.niagaraworldwide.com